Warning: THE VOID WIKI IS DEPRECATED. It is no longer being maintained, contains outdated and incorrect information, and will eventually be shut down. Please refer to the Void Handbook, https://docs.voidlinux.org/, for the official documentation. If you can't find the information you're seeking, please raise an issue at https://github.com/void-linux/void-docs/issues

Difference between revisions of "Proprietary Video Drivers"

From Void Linux Wiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search
m
m (Typos, style guide.)
Line 3: Line 3:
 
== AMD ==
 
== AMD ==
  
To install the proprietary AMD catalyst driver firstly you should enable the
+
To install the proprietary AMD catalyst driver firstly you should enable the {{pkg|void-repo-nonfree}} repository:
`nonfree` repository:
 
  
    # xbps-install -Sy void-repo-nonfree
+
# xbps-install -Sy void-repo-nonfree
  
and then install the `catalyst` package:
+
and then install the {{pkg|catalyst}} package:
  
    # xbps-install -Sy catalyst
+
# xbps-install -Sy catalyst
 
 
Once it is installed you should reboot and then the `fglrx` kernel module should
 
be already working. If it does not work you can always blacklist the `fglrx` kernel module
 
and boot from `single user` (selecting it in the GRUB menu).
 
  
 +
Once it is installed you should reboot and then the `fglrx` kernel module should be already working. If it does not work, you can always blacklist the `fglrx` kernel module and boot from `single user` (selecting it in the GRUB menu).
  
 
=== Switching back to the open source drivers ===
 
=== Switching back to the open source drivers ===
  
Remove the `catalyst` package:
+
Remove the ''catalyst'' package:
  
    # xbps-remove -RyvF catalyst
+
# xbps-remove -RyvF catalyst
  
Reinstall the `libGL` package:
+
Reinstall the {{pkg|libGL}} package:
  
    # xbps-install -Sy libGL
+
# xbps-install -Sy libGL
  
 
and then reboot your system.
 
and then reboot your system.
Line 31: Line 27:
 
== NVIDIA ==
 
== NVIDIA ==
  
To install the propietary NVIDIA driver firstly you should enable the
+
To install the proprietary NVIDIA driver firstly you should enable the {{pkg|void-repo-nonfree}} repository:
`nonfree` repository:
 
  
    # xbps-install -Sy void-repo-nonfree
+
# xbps-install -Sy void-repo-nonfree
  
and then install the `nvidia` package:
+
and then install the {{pkg|nvidia}} package:
  
    # xbps-install -Sy nvidia
+
# xbps-install -Sy nvidia
  
If you own a somewhat older GPU card (Geforce 6/7/8) you should install the
+
If you own a somewhat older GPU card (Geforce 6/7/8) you should install the {{pkg|nvidia304}} package instead.
`nvidia304` package instead.
 
  
Once it is installed you should reboot and then the `nvidia` kernel module should
+
Once it is installed you should reboot and then the `nvidia` kernel module should be already working. If it does not work, you can always blacklist the `nvidia` kernel module and then boot from `single user` (selecting it in the GRUB menu).
be already working. If it does not work you can always blacklist the `nvidia`
 
kernel module and then boot from `single user` (selecting it in the GRUB menu).
 
  
 
=== Optimus ===
 
=== Optimus ===
  
If you have a laptop or netbook, your Nvidia card's model ends with an M like "GeForce GTX 680M", and you also have an Intel card, then you almost certainly have a card than uses the Optimus technology. This requires a little manual set up.
+
If you have a laptop or netbook, your Nvidia card's model ends with an M like "GeForce GTX 680M", and you also have an Intel card, then you almost certainly have a card than uses the Optimus technology. This requires a little manual set up.
  
First you need to find your card's BusID.
+
First, you need to find your card's BusID:
  
    # lspci | grep VGA
+
# lspci | grep VGA
  
The PCI address is the first 7 characters of the line that mentions NVIDIA. It will look something like 01:00.0. In the xorg.conf, you will need to format it as #:#:#; e.g. 01:00.0 would be formatted as 1:0:0.
+
The PCI address is the first 7 characters of the line that mentions NVIDIA. It will look something like 01:00.0. In xorg.conf, you will need to format it as #:#:#; e.g. 01:00.0 would be formatted as 1:0:0.
  
Then you need to create a custom /etc/X11/xorg.conf file. Since Void Linux is a rolling distribution, you're likely using a version of xorg higher than 1.17.2. You can check what version you're running with:
+
Then you need to create a custom {{path|/etc/X11/xorg.conf}} file. Since Void Linux is a rolling distribution, you're likely using a version of xorg higher than 1.17.2. You can check what version you're running with:
  
  # Xorg -version
+
# Xorg -version
  
For xorg versions 1.17.2 or higher, create your custom /etc/X11/xorg.conf file with these directives:
+
For xorg versions 1.17.2 or higher, create your custom {{path|/etc/X11/xorg.conf}} file with these directives:
  
 
<pre>
 
<pre>
Line 110: Line 102:
 
</pre>
 
</pre>
  
In either case, you'll need to add a couple lines to your ~/.xinitrc file.
+
In either case, you'll need to add a couple of lines to your {{path|~/.xinitrc}} file:
  
    xrandr --setprovideroutputsource modesetting NVIDIA-0
+
xrandr --setprovideroutputsource modesetting NVIDIA-0
    xrandr --auto
+
xrandr --auto
  
 
==== Display Managers ====
 
==== Display Managers ====
Line 121: Line 113:
 
=== Switching back to the open source drivers ===
 
=== Switching back to the open source drivers ===
  
Remove the `nvidia` package:
+
Remove the {{pkg|nvidia}} package:
  
    # xbps-remove -RyvF nvidia
+
# xbps-remove -RyvF nvidia
  
Reinstall the `libGL` package:
+
Reinstall the {{pkg|libGL}} package:
  
    # xbps-install -Sy libGL
+
# xbps-install -Sy libGL
  
On some systems it may be necessary to install the `libEGL` package aswell:
+
On some systems it may be necessary to install the {{pkg|libEGL}} package as well:
  
    # xbps-install -Sy libEGL
+
# xbps-install -Sy libEGL
  
 
and then reboot your system.
 
and then reboot your system.
  
 
[[Category:Guides]]
 
[[Category:Guides]]

Revision as of 11:25, 12 September 2017

AMD

To install the proprietary AMD catalyst driver firstly you should enable the void-repo-nonfree repository:

# xbps-install -Sy void-repo-nonfree

and then install the catalyst package:

# xbps-install -Sy catalyst

Once it is installed you should reboot and then the `fglrx` kernel module should be already working. If it does not work, you can always blacklist the `fglrx` kernel module and boot from `single user` (selecting it in the GRUB menu).

Switching back to the open source drivers

Remove the catalyst package:

# xbps-remove -RyvF catalyst

Reinstall the libGL package:

# xbps-install -Sy libGL

and then reboot your system.

NVIDIA

To install the proprietary NVIDIA driver firstly you should enable the void-repo-nonfree repository:

# xbps-install -Sy void-repo-nonfree

and then install the nvidia package:

# xbps-install -Sy nvidia

If you own a somewhat older GPU card (Geforce 6/7/8) you should install the nvidia304 package instead.

Once it is installed you should reboot and then the `nvidia` kernel module should be already working. If it does not work, you can always blacklist the `nvidia` kernel module and then boot from `single user` (selecting it in the GRUB menu).

Optimus

If you have a laptop or netbook, your Nvidia card's model ends with an M like "GeForce GTX 680M", and you also have an Intel card, then you almost certainly have a card than uses the Optimus technology. This requires a little manual set up.

First, you need to find your card's BusID:

# lspci | grep VGA

The PCI address is the first 7 characters of the line that mentions NVIDIA. It will look something like 01:00.0. In xorg.conf, you will need to format it as #:#:#; e.g. 01:00.0 would be formatted as 1:0:0.

Then you need to create a custom /etc/X11/xorg.conf file. Since Void Linux is a rolling distribution, you're likely using a version of xorg higher than 1.17.2. You can check what version you're running with:

# Xorg -version

For xorg versions 1.17.2 or higher, create your custom /etc/X11/xorg.conf file with these directives:

Section "Module"
        Load "modesetting"
EndSection

Section "Device"
        Identifier "nvidia"
        Driver "nvidia"
        BusID "PCI:PCI address determined earlier"
        # e.g. BusID "PCI:1:0:0"
        Option "AllowEmptyInitialConfiguration"
EndSection

For versions of xorg 1.17.1 or lower, this should work:

    Section "ServerLayout"
        Identifier "layout"
        Screen 0 "nvidia"
        Inactive "intel"
    EndSection

    Section "Device"
        Identifier "nvidia"
        Driver "nvidia"
        BusID "PCI:PCI address determined earlier"
        # e.g. BusID "PCI:1:0:0"
    EndSection

    Section "Screen"
        Identifier "nvidia"
        Device "nvidia"
        Option "AllowEmptyInitialConfiguration"
    EndSection

    Section "Device"
        Identifier "intel"
        Driver "modesetting"
    EndSection

    Section "Screen"
        Identifier "intel"
        Device "intel"
    EndSection

In either case, you'll need to add a couple of lines to your ~/.xinitrc file:

xrandr --setprovideroutputsource modesetting NVIDIA-0
xrandr --auto

Display Managers

If you're using a display manager, the xrandr lines above should be called by the display manager versus .xinitrc. How/where is dependent upon the particular display manager.

Switching back to the open source drivers

Remove the nvidia package:

# xbps-remove -RyvF nvidia

Reinstall the libGL package:

# xbps-install -Sy libGL

On some systems it may be necessary to install the libEGL package as well:

# xbps-install -Sy libEGL

and then reboot your system.